Astronomy

Maunakea Skies: Recent Discoveries & Future Promise

September 16, 2016, 1:42 PM HST
* Updated September 16, 1:45 PM
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Among the observatories atop Maunakea, the UKIRT Telescope utilizes a unique panoramic camera sensitive to infrared radiation which allows for an outpouring of scientific discoveries both close to Earth and far into the universe.

Among the observatories atop Maunakea, the UKIRT Telescope utilizes a unique panoramic camera sensitive to infrared radiation which allows for an outpouring of scientific discoveries both close to Earth and far into the universe. Courtesy photo.

Among the observatories atop Maunakea, the UKIRT Telescope utilizes a unique panoramic camera sensitive to infrared radiation which allows for an outpouring of scientific discoveries both close to Earth and far into the universe.

This will be the subject of the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center’s next Maunakea Skies talk on Friday, Sept. 16, at 7 p.m., presented by Dr. Richard Green, director of UKIRT Observatory.

Green will discuss the telescope’s use of infrared radiation and UKIRT’s promising plans for the future.

Dr. Richard Green, director of UKIRT Observatory. Courtesy photo.

Dr. Richard Green, director of UKIRT Observatory. Courtesy photo.

“I will talk about the latest results on the most distant galaxies, how the supermassive black holes that power quasars grow with time and how UKIRT helps find Earth-like planets in the habitable zones around nearby stars,” said Green. “Not only will UKIRT continue to observe the most distant galaxies and quasars along with stars in our Galaxy, it will also be used to characterize objects right next door—orbital space debris and asteroids coming very near the Earth.”

In addition to directing the UKIRT Observatory, Green is also the Assistant Director for Government Relations of Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona. He graduated from Harvard College in 1971 before receiving his Ph.D. from CalTech. His major research interests are quasars, the early Universe and the nuclei of galaxies.

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‘Imiloa’s monthly Maunakea Skies program includes observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, hosted by Planetarium Technician ʻĀhia Dye. The audience can view prominent constellations and stars visible during this time of year. Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month.

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General admission tickets are $10, $8 for members (member level discounts apply).

Pre-purchase tickets at ‘Imiloa’s front desk or by phone at (808) 932-8901.

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