Lifestyle

Ms Aloha Nui Pageant Perpetuates Hawai‘i’s Traditions & Spirit

September 4, 2016, 10:24 AM HST
* Updated September 8, 5:25 PM
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The 2016 Hawaii Island Festival – 30 Days of Aloha, “Na Lehua Makamae–Our Treasured Lehua,” kicked off on Friday, Sept. 2, with the Ms Aloha Nui Pageant. This year’s competition was held at the Hapuna Beach Prince Hotel, where six beautiful women vied for the title.

The Ms Aloha Nui Pageant Facebook page beautifully explains in detail the reason for this competition: “The purpose of this event, the Ms Aloha Nui Pageant, is to perpetuate Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions and aloha spirit. Native cultures and ethnicities around the globe hold their large women in high regard, and Hawai‘i is no different. The Ms Aloha Nui Pageant was created to honor the women of great stature, larger than 200 pounds, who personify the spirit of aloha. This is a unique event and unlike any other event in the pageantry division.”

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Many women in our Hawaiian Monarchy were of great stature—in all meanings of the word, these were women of great wealth, power and love for their people. The stories and legends of our people were also filled with mana wahine of every shape and size.

The Ms Aloha Nui pageant celebrates and honors the women of today and the women of yesteryear who hold these beliefs.

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This isn’t just a competition, it’s an opportunity to meet other women and celebrate who we are and form lasting friendships.

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To participate as a contestant, you need only be a female Hawaiʻi resident, 18 years or older and at least 200 pounds.

Judging categories are Introduction, Aloha Wear, Talent, Evening Wear and Interview. Prizes are awarded to the Ms Aloha Nui winner, first runner-up and talent.

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Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani. Wikimedia Commons photo.

The contestants opened the evening with a chant paying tribute to Princess Ruth Ke‘elikōlani, a woman of great stature in Hawaiian history, and the greatest and richest woman in Hawai‘i at the time.

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In the talent portion of the competition, contestants showcased a variety of gifts—from sign language performances and singing to hula. The crowd was wowed by the diversity displayed by the contestants.

Shari Ann Drummundo from Waimea won not only the talent award by stunning the crowd with her beautifully graceful worship hula with members of her church, but also was won the title of 2016 Ms Aloha Nui, with the highest combined score for the night.

In the evening attire portion of the event, she chose to wear her custom-made gown, using material from her signature designer wedding dress.

As the new Ms Aloha Nui, Drummundo will reign over the Hawaii Island Festival – 30 Days of Aloha celebration throughout the month of September and will make several other appearances throughout the year.

With the second highest combined score for the night, Kalei Lagaret, also from Waimea, earned the first runner-up award.

She wore a beautiful, velvet, maroon holoku adorned with a long, 12-strand, white shell necklace, and performed a beautiful hula.

For more information regarding this competition, email [email protected].

For more information on the on the 30 Days of Aloha celebration, go online.

Newly crowned 2016 Ms. Aloha Nui. Darde Gamayo photo.

Newly crowned 2016 Ms. Aloha Nui. Darde Gamayo photo.

Kalei Lagaret, first runner up of the Ms Aloha Nui pageant, 2016.

Kalei Lagaret, first runner-up of the Ms Aloha Nui pageant, 2016.

(L–R) Ms Aloha Nui pageant winners: 2015, Jacelyn Auna; 2010, Kalae Yonemura; 2016, Shari Ann Drummundo; 2009, Darde Gamayo. Courtesy photo.

(L–R) Ms Aloha Nui pageant winners: 2015, Jacelyn Auna; 2010, Kalae Yonemura; 2016, Shari Ann Drummundo; 2009, Darde Gamayo. Courtesy photo.

2015 Ms Aloha Nui winner Jacelyn Auna crowned and pinned the 2016 winner Shari Ann Drummundo. Darde Gamayo photo.

2015 Ms Aloha Nui winner Jacelyn Auna crowned and pinned the 2016 winner Shari Ann Drummundo. Darde Gamayo photo.

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