East Hawaii News

Final Phase of Hilo Harbor Pier 4 Breaks Ground

January 15, 2016, 3:05 PM HST
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State executives and dignitaries gather to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Pier 4 Inter-Island Cargo Terminal, the final phase of the Pier 4 project at Hilo Harbor. From left to right: Senator Gilbert Kahele; Roy Catalani, Vice President, Young Brothers, Limited; Darrell Young, HDOT Deputy Director Harbors Division; Wil Okabe, Governor David Ige's Representative; Representative Clift Tsuji; Senator Lorraine Inouye; Rick Heltzel, Hawaii Harbors Constructors JV. DOT courtesy photo.

State executives and dignitaries gather to celebrate the groundbreaking of the Pier 4 Inter-Island Cargo Terminal, the final phase of the Pier 4 project at Hilo Harbor. From left to right: Senator Gilbert Kahele; Roy Catalani, Vice President, Young Brothers, Limited; Darrell Young, HDOT Deputy Director Harbors Division; Wil Okabe, Governor David Ige’s Representative; Representative Clift Tsuji; Senator Lorraine Inouye; Rick Heltzel, Hawai’i Harbors Constructors JV. DOT courtesy photo.

The Pier 4 Project at Hilo Harbor was celebrated with a groundbreaking and dedication/blessing ceremony Friday morning.

Friday’s ceremony celebrates the final phase of the project, the Pier 4 Inter-Island Cargo Terminal.

Involved in the project is the creation of a 602-linear foot reinforced concrete pier with associated site work located west of the existing Pier 3.

“The construction of Pier 4 at Hilo Harbor will create a dedicated operating area for inter-island cargo operations which will relieve the issues that the harbor currently experiences,” said DOT Director Ford Fuchigami. “Transporting provisions to Hawai’i County will become more efficient, thus promoting economic and social growth.”

Hawai’i Department of Transportation’s project consists of multiple phases, including dredging and construction of the Pier 4 Inter-Island Cargo Terminal, construction of the Inter-Island Cargo Terminal Facility–Container Yard, and Kumau Street Entrance Improvements.

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As part of the completed Inter-Island Cargo Terminal Facility – Container Yard component of the project, a portion of the existing container yard was reconstructed and a new adjacent container yard with a comfort station, lighting, and utilities was added. Four acres are not able to be used for cargo operations, making up a total of 10 acres as result of the phase.

Kahu Brian Welsh leads the untying of the maile lei, signifying the official completion of the Kumau Street Entrance Improvements. From left to right: Darrell Young, HDOT Deputy Director Harbors Division; Jade Butay, HDOT Deputy Director Administration; Senator Lorraine Inouye; Representative Clift Tsuji; Wil Okabe, Governor David Ige's Representative; Senator Gilbert Kahele; Roy Catalani, Vice President, Young Brothers, Limited; Ivan Kabei, Hawaiian Dredging Construction Company; Kahu Brian Welsh. DOT courtesy photo.

Kahu Brian Welsh leads the untying of the maile lei, signifying the official completion of the Kumau Street Entrance Improvements. From left to right: Darrell Young, HDOT Deputy Director Harbors Division; Jade Butay, HDOT Deputy Director Administration; Senator Lorraine Inouye; Representative Clift Tsuji; Wil Okabe, Governor David Ige’s Representative; Senator Gilbert Kahele; Roy Catalani, Vice President, Young Brothers, Limited; Ivan Kabei, Hawaiian Dredging Construction Company; Kahu Brian Welsh. DOT courtesy photo.

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In addition, the completed Kumau Street Entrance improvement widened the street from a two-lane roadways to a four-lane roadway to relieve traffic congestion and enhance safety. The project also provided intersection improvements, including new asphaltic concrete pavement, concrete sidewalks, curbs, gutters, drainage system, water main, and additional street lighting at the Kalanianaole Street Intersection.

The total cost of the project is $68.5 million and work on the final phase is expected to be completed by July 2017.

Pier 2 was constructed in the 1920’s and is the current site of inter-island cargo operation. Space limitations require Pier 2 to use space from Pier 1 and Pier 3. The combined usages makes cargo and cruise ship operations intermingle.

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DOT officials say that creating Pier 4, a larger pier with a dedicated area, will improve safety and efficiency by separating the cargo and passenger operations. It will replace the aging Pier 2 and be able to support new container handling equipment and vessels.

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