East Hawaii News

Kilauea Summit Update – 7/27/15

July 27, 2015, 10:36 AM HST
Listen to this Article
1 minute
Loading Audio...
A
A
A

The summit of Kilauea underwent deflationary tilt on Sunday, a trend that continued into Monday. As a result of the deflation, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that the lava lake within the Overlook crater has also dropped slightly.

According to HVO, fluctuations within the lava lake were also seen as spattering occurred.

Seismic levels remain at low background levels, with small earthquakes below Kilauea summit, along the Southwest Rift Zone, and across the south flank of Kilauea.

Puʻu ʻŌʻō has seen no change in recent weeks. HVO noted Monday that the incandescent, outgassing vents within Puʻu ʻŌʻō remain. Seismicity also continues at low background levels.

Webcam observation by HVO geologists of the June 27, 2014 lava flow continue to show activity on the flow field. Breakouts have been observed in an area about 2.5 to 5 miles to the northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō.

    +
    SWIPE LEFT OR RIGHT
July 23: This photograph looks west along the East Rift Zone, towards Puʻu ʻŌʻō and Kīlauea's summit. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen near the horizon, on the left side of the image. Kīlauea's summit plume can be seen in the distance in the upper right portion of the photograph. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: This photograph looks west along the East Rift Zone, towards Puʻu ʻŌʻō and Kīlauea’s summit. Puʻu ʻŌʻō can be seen near the horizon, on the left side of the image. Kīlauea’s summit plume can be seen in the distance in the upper right portion of the photograph. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: A closer look at the north margin of the June 27, 2014 lava flow, where breakouts are active at the forest boundary. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: A closer look at the north margin of the June 27, 2014 lava flow, where breakouts are active at the forest boundary. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: Breakouts have further buried Puʻu Kahaualeʻa in recent weeks. The cone was originally covered in thick vegetation, but on July 23 only a single dead tree stood on the remnants of the cone rim. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: Breakouts have further buried Puʻu Kahaualeʻa in recent weeks. The cone was originally covered in thick vegetation, but on July 23 only a single dead tree stood on the remnants of the cone rim. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: An HVO geologist collects a sample of lava, quenching it in a bucket of water. Chemical analysis of the lava provides insight into changes in the magma plumbing system. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: An HVO geologist collects a sample of lava, quenching it in a bucket of water. Chemical analysis of the lava provides insight into changes in the magma plumbing system. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: This photograph shows overflows from April and May (dark lava in bottom portion of photograph) covering the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: This photograph shows overflows from April and May (dark lava in bottom portion of photograph) covering the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: Pele's hair covers the roadside along Crater Rim Drive, next to the Halemaʻumaʻu parking lot, in an area of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park closed, July 23, to the public due to proximity to the summit lava lake. The Pele's hair (long strand of volcanic glass) is emitted from the lava lake and carried upwards by the rising gas plume, and then drifts downwind. USGS/HVO photo.

July 23: Pele’s hair covers the roadside along Crater Rim Drive, next to the Halemaʻumaʻu parking lot, in an area of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park closed, July 23, to the public due to proximity to the summit lava lake. The Pele’s hair (long strand of volcanic glass) is emitted from the lava lake and carried upwards by the rising gas plume, and then drifts downwind. USGS/HVO photo.

Comments

This comments section is a public community forum for the purpose of free expression. Although Big Island Now encourages respectful communication only, some content may be considered offensive. Please view at your own discretion. View Comments

Newsletters

Get a quick summary of what’s happening on the Big Island with our daily & weekly email of news highlights.