East Hawaii News

Kilauea Summit Update – 6/5/15

June 5, 2015, 10:59 AM HST
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Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that a slow deflationary trend has taken over the inflationary tilt that began at the summit of Kilauea on June 1.

According to HVO, the deflationary tilt began Friday morning.

At the summit, seismic tremor reportedly continues within the Overlook crater with episodic bursts that are associated with spattering. As of Friday morning, the lava lake within the Overlook crater was measured to be about 154 feet below the current floor of Halema’uma’u, which is now being called the new rim of the Overlook vent.

Seismicity below Kilauea’s summit, as well as at Puʻu ʻŌʻō have consistently remained at background levels in the recent weeks.

HVO says the tiltmeters on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō have shown no significant tilt in the past day.

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Active lava flows part of the June 27 lava flow persist in an area northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, according to HVO scientists who are monitoring the flows through webcam and satellite imagery. HVO geologists participating in both ground and overflight assessments Thursday say the activity remains about 5 miles within Puʻu ʻŌʻō

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June 4: Lava pours out of a tube and feeds the river. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: Lava pours out of a tube and feeds the river. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: The crusted surface of a river of lava breaks apart as it picks up a little speed and flows down a slope. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: The crusted surface of a river of lava breaks apart as it picks up a little speed and flows down a slope. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A fresh breakout pushes into a kipuka, toppling trees as it advances. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A fresh breakout pushes into a kipuka, toppling trees as it advances. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A flow surrounds a little kipuka and begins consuming it. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A flow surrounds a little kipuka and begins consuming it. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: The distal tip creeps into the ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: The distal tip creeps into the ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A tighter shot of the distal tip. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A tighter shot of the distal tip. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A little pond of lava was still visible within the collapse pit inside of Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater, while a couple of skylights were also glowing. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A little pond of lava was still visible within the collapse pit inside of Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater while a couple of skylights were also glowing. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: Activity continues on the east rift zone, as a new distal tip pushing to the east creeps to within a mile of the crack system that infamously transported lava toward Pahoa last year. Although not as robust as the past couple of weeks, this new flow is running adjacent to the cooled June 27th flow. This photo looks east, smoke rising from the distal tip as the flow runs adjacent to the June 27th flow of last year. In the distance, the lava field narrows in the vicinity of the crack system. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: This photo looks east,  with smoke rising from the distal tip as the flow runs adjacent to the June 27th flow of last year. In the distance, the lava field narrows in the vicinity of the crack system. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: Bird's eye view of the distal tip. Not a whole lot of volume, but it continues to creep along. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: A bird’s eye view of the distal tip. Not a whole lot of volume can be seen, but it continues to creep along. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 4: Recent lava on the June 27 flow cascaded over the overhanging rim of this collapse pit on an earlier portion of the flow field. USGS/HVO photo.

June 4: Recent lava on the June 27 flow cascaded over the overhanging rim of this collapse pit on an earlier portion of the flow field. USGS/HVO photo.

June 4: A small forested cone of Puʻu Kahaualeʻa has been slowly buried by flows over the past several months. USGS/HVO photo.

June 4: A small forested cone of Puʻu Kahaualeʻa has been slowly buried by flows over the past several months. USGS/HVO photo.



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