East Hawaii News

June 27 Lava Flow Update – 2/16/15

February 16, 2015, 9:00 AM HST
* Updated February 16, 9:02 AM
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Following its Monday morning overflight assessment of the June 27 lava flow, Hawai’i County Civil Defense reported an advancement of 40 yards from the small breakout along the south margin of the flow. The breakout, which was first reported Sunday, is located about 600 yards upslope from the original stalled flow front just above the Pahoa MarketPlace.

Civil Defense also says that although no change in advancement in other downslope areas has occurred, “surface breakouts along both margins upslope of the flow front continue and provide indication that the tube system continues to be supplied and lave from the source is making its way to downslope areas.”

Activity in all areas of the June 27 lava flow does not currently pose a threat to communities in the area and is being monitored by Civil Defense and Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The public will continue to be updated as changes occur.

Light to moderate smoke conditions were reported Monday morning as a light northwest wind was blowing smoke in a southeast direction. These conditions have the possibility as changing, and those who are sensitive or suffer from respiratory issues are advised to take necessary precautions.

Officials say that burning activity related to the lava has been limited to vegetation burning along the edges of the breakouts. Fire conditions will continue to be monitored closely.

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In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, multiple toes of lava ooze from an active lobe, covering an old ‘a‘a flow in the vicinity of the perched channel. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, multiple toes of lava ooze from an active lobe, covering an old ‘a‘a flow in the vicinity of the perched channel. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this  photo, taken on Feb. 13,  a breakout takes down several trees, as margins of the flow field slowly continue to expand just upslope of the distal tip. Photo credit" Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, a breakout takes down several trees, as margins of the flow field slowly continue to expand just upslope of the distal tip. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, an ohia sapling in the middle of an ‘a‘a field is surrounded by pahoehoe. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopter.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, an ohia sapling in the middle of an ‘a‘a field is surrounded by pahoehoe. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopter.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, an ‘a‘a flow field is covered by pahoehoe in the vicinity of the perched channel about two miles downslope of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, an ‘a‘a flow field is covered by pahoehoe in the vicinity of the perched channel about two miles downslope of Pu‘u ‘O‘o. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

Seen in this photo, taken Feb. 13, high altitude winds created lenticular clouds over the eastern slopes and summits of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

Seen in this photo, taken Feb. 13, high altitude winds created lenticular clouds over the eastern slopes and summits of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken Feb. 13, an active lobe of lava surrounds the trunk of a 40 foot ohia about a 1/2 mile upslope of the distal tip. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken Feb. 13, an active lobe of lava surrounds the trunk of a 40 foot ohia about a 1/2 mile upslope of the distal tip. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

This photo, taken on Feb. 13, shows robust activity continues in the vicinity of the perched channel, as lava creeps into the forest along the northern edge of the flow field. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

This photo, taken on Feb. 13, shows robust activity continues in the vicinity of the perched channel, as lava creeps into the forest along the northern edge of the flow field. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, moderate activity continued in the vicinity of the old geothermal pad, as lava continued to slowly expand the flow field. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, moderate activity continued in the vicinity of the old geothermal pad, as lava continued to slowly expand the flow field. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, a few active lobes of lava were visible, and continue to expand the boundaries of the flow field just above the distal tip. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

In this photo, taken on Feb. 13, a few active lobes of lava were visible, and continue to expand the boundaries of the flow field just above the distal tip. Photo credit: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

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