East Hawaii News

June 27 Lava Flow Update – 12/31/14

December 31, 2014, 8:36 AM HST
* Updated December 31, 8:39 AM
Listen to this Article
1 minute
Loading Audio...
A
A
A

The leading edge of the June 27 lava flow has once again stalled, showing no advancement since Tuesday.

Hawai’i County Civil Defense said Wednesday after its morning overflight assessment that the front of the flow continues to remain 0.5 miles upslope of the Highway 130 and Pahoa Village Road intersection. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists also noted the stall in flow advancement during its Tuesday afternoon overflight.

Continued activity with breakouts along the south and north margins of the flow were observed during the overflight. Civil Defense however, noted that the activity is not posing a current threat to communities in the area. Along with Hawaiian Volcano Observatory personnel, Civil Defense is maintaining a close watch over activity and will continue to inform the public of any changes.

According to Civil Defense, a brush fire occurred on Tuesday. The small fire was the result of the flow making contact with light brush and vegetation. The fire was contained within the fire break areas and, as of Wednesday morning, there was no fire activity.

HVO announced on Tuesday a total flow advancement of about 150 yards since Dec. 27, which is when the flow began advancing after being stalled for nearly five days.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Light to moderate smoke conditions were reported as a light variable wind blows smoke. These smoke conditions, as usual, have the possibility of increasing. Officials advise that individuals who are sensitive or have respiratory issues take necessary precautions and stay indoors.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Railroad Avenue continues to remain open as an alternate access road. The opening of the road was to allow motorists to familiarize themselves with the road and traffic flow. It is advised that motorists remain on the designated route and comply with the posted speed limit.

There are no anticipated plans to close Highway 130 at this time, as it currently remains open.

    +
    SWIPE LEFT OR RIGHT
In this photo taken Dec. 30, you can see the leading part of the flow that consists of several small, active lobes. The view is to the northeast. HVO photo.

In this photo taken Dec. 30, you can see the leading part of the flow that consists of several small, active lobes. The view is to the northeast. HVO photo.

In this photo taken on Dec. 30, you can see a close view of incandescence in spatter cone within a pit at the northeast edge of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s crater. HVO photo.

In this photo taken on Dec. 30, you can see a close view of incandescence in spatter cone within a pit at the northeast edge of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s crater. HVO photo.

In this photo taken on Dec. 30 you can see a clear view of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s summit. HVO photo.

In this photo taken on Dec. 30 you can see a clear view of Puʻu ʻŌʻō’s summit. HVO photo.

This photo compares a normal photo of the active flow front with a thermal image. The photograph has been cropped and rotated to approximate the perspective of the thermal image. HVO photo.

This photo compares a normal photo of the active flow front with a thermal image. The photograph has been cropped and rotated to approximate the perspective of the thermal image. HVO photo.

Comments

This comments section is a public community forum for the purpose of free expression. Although Big Island Now encourages respectful communication only, some content may be considered offensive. Please view at your own discretion. View Comments

Newsletters

Get a quick summary of what’s happening on the Big Island with our daily & weekly email of news highlights.