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HVNP Unleashes Bark Ranger Program

February 28, 2021, 2:00 PM HST
* Updated February 28, 10:26 AM
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Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park implements a new program so dogs and their humans can have a “pawsitive” experience in the park, all while keeping people, pets and wildlife safe. Dogs have the opportunity to become “Bark Rangers” through the new program. The self-guided program is as easy as BARK!

Bag your dog’s waste and remove it.

Always leash your dog. Keep your dog on a six-foot leash and under control at all times.

Respect wildlife. The park is home to many native species, most notably the State Bird of Hawaiʻi, the nēnē.

Know were you can go.

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The first step to getting your furry family member Bark-Ranger certified is to visit the bark website, watch the new video and take the BARK pledge. Download and fill out the Bark Ranger certificate, bring your certificate to the park, and get it stamped by a two-legged park ranger at Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Your pup is now a doggone Bark Ranger! Need some bone-a-fide bling on that collar? Bring your Bark Ranger certificate to the Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association store. The non-profit partner has Bark Ranger dog tags available for purchase ($5.95) and will soon have Bark Ranger bandanas. All proceeds support your park.

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Dogs and other pets are not allowed in many areas of the park for safety reasons, and for the protection of threatened and endangered native species. Bark Rangers and their humans know where they can go (always on a leash), including Mauna Loa Road and most paved parking areas and surrounding curbs, and some areas in Kahuku. Don’t end up in the dog house, visit the website for a complete list of pawsibilites. Check the Superintendent’s Compendium for exemptions regarding authorized service animals. All pets and service animals in the park must be leashed at all times.

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