Lifestyle

Lava Drama Film ‘Stoke’ Heads to Amazon

August 6, 2019, 10:15 AM HST
* Updated September 8, 3:26 PM
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Following a limited theatrical tour across the Pacific Northwest, Hawai’i road film Stoke heads to Amazon starting Tuesday, Aug. 6.

The film follows Jane, an entitled mainland tourist who hires two wannabe guides to take her to the Kilauea volcano.

Shot on Hawai‘i Island, the road-trip style drama was partially filmed in front of Kīlauea Volcano’s famous 2017 “lava hose,” and features many iconic Big Island landscapes that were covered in lava during the summer of 2018.

Heralded as “somber visual poetry” and “downright surreal” by the Hawai’i Film Critics Society, Stoke explores themes of grief and impermanence, dipping from playful to dark as the characters journey from one end of Hawai‘i Island to the other en route to the volcano.

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While Jane (Caitlin Holcombe) struggles with letting go of a grievous past, tension grows as Dusty (Ka‘uhane Lopes) and Po (Randall Galius Junior) grapple with the tourism industry created by their volcano, until an untimely detour ultimately sends the group in an unexpected direction.

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Stoke premiered at the Hawai‘i International Film Festival in late 2018, had a fleet of sell-out screenings during its statewide theatrical release in Hawai‘i before playing in select theaters in the Pacific Northwest in July.

In additional to a largely local cast, the film features music from popular Hawaiian artists like Willie K, Keali’i Reichel and Mark Keali‘i Ho‘omalu.

The film will be available for rent or purchase on Amazon beginning Tuesday, August 6.

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For more information, visit www.StokeTheMovie.com and www.Facebook.com/StokeTheMovie.

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