Hāmākua Coast Crime Report: May 2019

June 18, 2019, 3:47 PM HST (Updated June 18, 2019, 3:47 PM)
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The Hawai‘i Police Department’s Hāmākua Coast community officers responded to three burglaries, one assault and seven thefts in May 2019.

No murders, sex assaults, auto thefts or robberies were reported in this time frame.

HAMAKUA CRIME STATISTICS FOR MAY

NORTH HILO

CRIMEMAY 2018YTD 2018MAY 2019YTD 2019
MURDER0000
SEX ASSAULT0200
ROBBERY0000
ASSAULT1515
AUTO THEFT0105
BURGLARY01017
THEFT133430
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HONOKA‘A

CRIMEMAY 2018YTD 2018MAY 2019YTD 2019
MURDER0100
SEX ASSAULT0304
ROBBERY0100
ASSAULT118013
AUTO THEFT21101
BURGLARY517213
THEFT7129363

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

In Hawai‘i hurricane season is from June 1 to Nov. 30. This is a friendly reminder that being prepared for severe weather conditions is always akamai (smart). Let us be aware, prepare and avoid despair. The following are tips provided by the NOAA/National Weather Service to know what actions to take before, during and after a hurricane to increase your chance of survival.

BEFORE THE HURRICANE SEASON

Educate yourself online at www.nws.noaa.gov. Determine safe evacuation routes inland, Learn location of official shelters.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY EMERGENCY SHELTERS

Pet Friendly: Waiakea High, Kalanianaole Elementary, Keaau High, Pāhoa High, Honoka‘a High, Konawaena High, Ka‘ū High

Unable to Accommodate Pets: Hilo High, Laupahoehoe High, Waikoloa Elementary, Waimea Middle, Mt. View Elementary

WHAT TO BRING TO THE SHELTER

  • First aid kit, medicine, food, water, baby food and diapers, cards, games, books, music players with headphones, toiletries, battery-powered radio, cell phone, flashlights, one per person, extra batteries, a blanket or sleeping bag for each person, identification, valuable papers such as insurance policies, cash, credit card, dog food (if pet friendly).
  • Make emergency plans for pets. 
  • Check emergency equipment, such as flashlights, generators and battery-powered NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards and cell phones.
  • Buy nonperishable food and store drinking water.
  • Buy plywood or other material to protect your home.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts
  • Trim trees and shrubbery.
  • Decide where to move your boat in an emergency.
  • Review your insurance policy.

DURING THE STORM: WHEN IN A WATCH AREA

  • Listen frequently to radio, TV or NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards for bulletins of a storm’s progress.
  • Fuel and service your vehicles.
  • Inspect and secure mobile home tie-downs.
  • Board up windows in case the storm moves quickly and you have to evacuate.
  • Stock up on batteries, non-perishable food, first aid supplies, drinking water and medications.
  • Store lawn furniture and other loose, light-weight objects such as garbage cans and garden tools.
  • Have cash on hand in case power goes out and ATMs don’t work.

IF STAYING IN A HOME

  • Turn refrigerator to maximum cold and keep closed.
  • Turn off utilities if told to do so by authorities.
  • Turn off propane tanks
  • Unplug small appliances
  • Fill bathtub and large containers with water in case tap water is unavailable. Use water in bathtubs for cleaning and flushing only. Do NOT drink it.

IF WINDS BECOME STRONG

  • Stay away from windows and doors, even if they are covered. Take refuge in a small interior room, closed or hallway.
  • Close all interior doors. Secure and brace external doors.
  • If you are in a two story house, go to an interior 1st floor room.
  • If you are in a multi-story building and away from water, go to the 1st or 2nd floor and stay in the halls or other interior rooms away from windows.
  • Lie on the floor under a table or other sturdy object.

AFTER THE STORM

  • Keep listening to radio, TV or NOAA Weather Radio.
  • Wait until an area is declared safe before entering.
  • Watch for closed roads, if you come upon a barricade or a flooded road,
  • “Turn Around Don’t Drown!”
  • Avoid weakened bridges and washed out roads.
  • Stay on firm ground. Moving water only 6 inches deep can sweep you off your feet.
  • Standing water may be electrically charged from power lines.
  • Once home, check gas, water and electrical lines and appliances for damage.
  • Use a flashlight to inspect for damage. Never use candles and other open flames in-doors.
  • Do not drink or prepare food with tap water until officials say it is safe.
  • If using a generator, avoid electrocution by following manufacturer’s instructions and standard electric code.

For the full version of the emergency preparedness information go to:
www.hawaiicounty.gov/civil-defense (Under the information section: Hurricane Preparedness Guide)
www.nhe.noaa.gov/prepare/ready.php

 

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