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6 PM: Cat 4 Lane 515 Miles SE of Hilo

August 20, 2018, 9:04 AM HST
* Updated August 20, 6:38 PM
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Monday, Aug. 20, 2018, 6 p.m.: Cat 4 Lane 515 Miles SE of Hilo

Due to Hurricane Lane, a high surf advisory is issued for areas along east-facing shores, from Puna to Ka‘ū. A high surf advisory means surf poses a threat to life and property. Residents along the affected shores should be alert for high and dangerous surf conditions. Boat owners should take measures to secure their vessels.

Whittington and Punalu‘u Beach Parks are closed. All pavilion and camping permits for these parks have been cancelled.

Take this time to assure that family and business emergency plans are up to date.

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Also, make sure you are signed up for the Hawai‘i County Civil Defense emergency notification system through Blackboard.

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5 p.m.: Hurricane Lane to Head NW on Wednesday

Hurricane Lane, Aug. 20, 3:30 p.m. NOAA animation.

At 5 p.m., the eye of Category 4 Hurricane Lane was located near latitude 13.8 north, longitude 150.3 west, about 515 miles southeast of Hilo Lane is moving toward the west near 12 mph.

This general motion is expected to continue for the next day or so, with a turn more toward the northwest on Wednesday.

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Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph with higher gusts.

Some fluctuations in intensity are possible over the next 24 to 36 hours, with a gradual weakening trend expected to begin afterward.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

SURF: Large swells generated by Lane will impact the Hawaiian Islands this week. These swells will produce large and dangerous surf, as well as strong currents, along some shorelines.

RAINFALL: Heavy rainfall and possible flooding associated with Lane could affect portions of the state beginning later Wednesday.

Interests in the main Hawaiian Islands, and across the Northwestern
Hawaiian Islands, should continue to closely monitor the progress
of Hurricane Lane.

The next complete advisory will be available at 11 p.m

1:30 p.m.: Powerful Cat 4 Lane May Threaten Hawai‘i Midweek

Hurricane Lane, 1:30 p.m., Aug. 20, 2018. NOAA animation.

Powerful Lane, a Category 4 hurricane, is continuing on its path to the southeast of Hawai‘i. The cyclone may threaten the islands later this week.

At 11 a.m., the eye of Hurricane Lane was located by U.S. Air Force Reserve and NOAA Hurricane Hunters near latitude 13.6 north, longitude 149.1 west, 580 miles SE of Hilo.

Lane is moving toward the west near 12 mph.

A gradual turn toward the northwest and a slowing of forward motion are expected over the next few days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 130 mph with higher gusts. Little change in strength is expected for the next day or so, with a weakening trend expected to begin on Tuesday.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 125 miles.

HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND

SURF: Large swells generated by Lane will impact the Hawaiian Islands this week. These swells will produce large and dangerous surf, as well as strong currents, along some shorelines.

RAINFALL: Heavy rainfall and possible flooding associated with Lane is likely to affect portions of the state later this week.

There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect. Big Island port condition is rated X-RAY.

Interests in the main Hawaiian Islands, and across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, should continue to closely monitor the progress of Lane this week.

6 a.m.: Hurricane Lane 615 Miles SE of Hilo

Category 3 Hurricane Lane has taken a northward turn, according to Big Island Now Meteorologist Malika Dudley.

High winds, heavy rainfall and high surf are expected.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center reports that as of 5 a.m., Hurricane Lane is a Category 3 hurricane, approximately 615 miles SE of Hilo with sustained winds of 125 mph, moving west at approximately 14 mph. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the storm’s center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 120 miles.

“It’s showing a significant swing to the north as it kind of makes its way around the Big Island,” Talmadge Magno, Hawai‘i County Civil Defense Administrator said this morning. “So we’re concerned that it might bring impacts—definitely waves, not sure yet about what kind of winds or how much rain we’re going to get.”

Due to Hurricane Lane, a high surf advisory up to 10 feet has been issued for areas along east-facing shores, from Ka‘ū to Puna. A high surf advisory means breaking wave action poses a threat to life and property. Residents along the affected shores should be alert for high and dangerous surf conditions. Boat owners should take measures to secure their vessels.

“It’s going to build throughout the day,” Magno said. “For today’s forecast, about 10 feet, but as it gets closer, it’s going to get a little bit bigger.”

Magno said those along the affected shorelines should be alert for high and dangerous surf conditions and boat owners should take measures to secure their vessels.

 

Little change in strength is expected through early Tuesday, with some weakening possible starting late Tuesday.

Forecasters at the Central Pacific Hurricane Center said that residents and visitors on all islands should continue to closely monitor the progress of Lane this week.

A tropical storm or hurricane watch may be required for parts of Hawaii later today or tonight.

All schools and roads remain open at this time.

Lane is still forecast to pass south of the Big Island, but Magno reiterated that the island could experience some effects from the powerful storm.

Hurricane Lane’s impacts could be felt as early as Wednesday evening on Hawaii’s Big Island. All of the islands in the state could be directly or indirectly impacted by the storm in the coming days. Image: CPHC

“We are in hurricane season,” Magno said. “We had a close one over a week ago with Hector. This one’s got us a little more concerned, because the forecast is not as precise as Hector. So you should be prepared. Have your family plans and your business plans updated, at least. And we’ll be messaging folks after each National Weather Service forecast to let them know what impacts we’re looking at. So just stay tuned.”

All schools and roads are open at this time.

Civil Defense is monitoring the storm and will keep you informed of any changes that may affect your safety. Take this time to assure that family and business emergency plans are up to date. Also, make sure you are signed up for our emergency notification system through Blackboard.

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