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NOON: Update With Meteorologist Malika Dudley

August 5, 2018, 7:19 AM HST
* Updated August 5, 2:51 PM
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5 AM Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018, noon: Live Update With Meteorologist Malika Dudley

The Hurricane Hector and Kīlauea Volcano aren’t expected to significantly impact each other. Hot water from the volcano is not deep enough or expansive enough to strengthen the system nor is the hurricane expected to alter volcanic activity.

Having said that, the laze plume could go places it usually doesn’t, depending on the wind conditions.

When rain falls on a flow field, steam develops and copious amounts of rain could create copious amounts of steam that could seep into areas that usually don’t experience these conditions and acid steam could also occur.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Here is the link I talk about in the update.

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It says how to prepare for a tsunami—but the preparedness information is valid for any emergency.

Remember: Don’t be scared, be prepared.

5 a.m.: Hurricane Hector Advisory, NWS National Hurricane Center

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Rated as a Category 4 storm last night, Hurricane Hector lost some of its steam overnight and is now expected to cross into the Central Pacific as a powerful Category 3 storm.

At about 5 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018, Hector was packing maximum sustained winds near 125 mph with higher gusts—down from about 130 mph winds reported on Saturday when Hector strengthened to a Category 4.

The National Hurricane Center said Hector is expected to remain a major hurricane through the weekend.

On Sunday morning, Hector was situated about 1,280 miles east of South Point on the Big Island.

It should cross into the Central Pacific basin by Sunday night or early Monday.

The storm is moving west at about 12 mph, and this general motion is expected to continue through the weekend.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 30 miles from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 105 miles.

Little change in strength is expected through Monday, but some slight weakening is forecast Monday night through Wednesday.

The current track shows it would be roughly 250 miles southeast of Hilo on Wednesday.

Forecasters added that some additional weakening is expected Monday night through Wednesday.

“While the official forecast track continues to lie south of the Hawaiian Islands, it is too soon to determine what kind of impacts might occur in the state, since track errors can be large at long time ranges,” the National Hurricane Center said in a recent update. “This remains a good time for everyone in the Hawaiian Islands to ensure they have their hurricane plan in place.”

LOCATION: 14.4N 136.9W
ABOUT 1,280 MI E OF SOUTH POINT HAWAII
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS: 125 MPH
PRESENT MOVEMENT: W OR 275 DEGREES AT 12 MPH
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE: 28.26 INCHES

WATCHES AND WARNINGS
There are no coastal watches or warnings in effect. Interests in the Hawaiian Islands should monitor the progress of Hector.

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