4:50 PM: No Movement in Channel

August 5, 2018, 6:31 AM HST (Updated August 5, 2018, 4:51 PM)
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory tower viewed toward the east-southeast.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK from the Northeast Caldera Rim viewed toward the south.

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR AUG. 5, 2018

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Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018, 4:50 p.m.: No Movement in Channel

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes have reduced at Kīlauea  summit and the lava flow from Fissure 8 has no movement in the channel.

Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • HVO continues to monitor the volcano for indications of additional activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Vigorous lava flow could resume at any time.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Misty weather is coming and going at the summit of Kīlauea on Aug. 4, 2018. A break in the mist allowed this clear view of Halema‘uma‘u from the northeast rim of the caldera, from which talus (rock fragments) piled at the base of the steep crater walls can be seen. With each summit collapse. rocks in the crater walls are shaken loose, widening the crater. Since May 16, 2018, the crater depth has more than tripled and the diameter has more than doubled. PC: USGS

Sunday, Aug. 5, 2018, 3 p.m.: Summit & Fissure 8 Much Less Active

Lava Flow from Fissure 8 in Lower East Rift Zone is greatly diminished, according to the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Lava from Fissure 8 in the Lower East Rift Zone has diminished dramatically, with not much magma.

Meanwhile, the summit of Halema‘uma‘u is very quiet, and has slowed deflating, with few if any felt
quakes.

The last collapse event at the summit was noon on Thursday.

Be aware that the hazards associated with the eruption that began May 3 remain; there is still active lava in the channel going into the ocean.

There was also a significant increase in gas emissions from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō on Friday.

“It could be weeks or months before we feel comfortable calling the eruption and the summit collapse over,” said Tina Neal, the scientist-in-charge at HVO.

She noted that it is typical for eruptions to wax and wane.

Neal suggested that people read reports on hazard assessments on the HVO website, specifically regarding when and how eruptions end.

Meanwhile, work on an emergency bypass road adjacent to Highway 11 in Volcano is ongoing. The tremors at the Halema‘uma‘u summit have destabilized Highway 11, the only artery connecting Ka‘ū to the rest of the island.

The county is cooperating with federal and state agencies on the construction of the two-mile bypass.

There is no precise time frame on when the bypass road will be completed, but the county recognizes the urgency of the situation as the new school year starts this week.

6 a.m.: Summit Quake Frequency Decreases

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at a decreased rate at the Kīlauea summit.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt with lower lava levels. The lava channel is sluggish, but still active.

Lava continues to enter the ocean creating a laze plume. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

Motorists on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 mile marker are advised to stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Vigorous lava flow could resume at anytime.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.
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