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4 PM: New Map Released

July 30, 2018, 7:20 AM HST
* Updated July 30, 4:23 PM
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory tower viewed toward the east-southeast.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK from the Northeast Caldera Rim viewed toward the south.

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JULY 30, 2018

Monday, July 30, 2018, 4 p.m.: New Map Released

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Map as of noon, July 30, 2018.

Map of the East Rift Zone on July 30, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

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Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, fissures starting and stopping, and varying rates of lava effusion, map details shown here are accurate as of the date/time noted. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960 and 2014-2015.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that earthquakes continue at Kilauea summit and Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel, sending flows to the ocean at Ahalanui and creating a large laze plume. This morning, HVO field crews report low lava levels in the channel and no overflows. The margin of the flow at the ocean entry has not advanced and remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki boat ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but requests motorists between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement, be alert for changing roadway conditions, and drive with caution. Motorcyclists and bicyclists should proceed with extreme caution.

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On Tuesday, July 31, from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m., the Hawai‘i Police Department will be shutting down Highway 11 between Kukui Camp Road and North Kulani Road in Mountain View for investigative purposes. No traffic will be allowed in either direction during this time.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a laze plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pāhoa Community Center, located at 15-3016 Kauhale St., Pāhoa. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani St. in Hilo.

Monday, July 30, 2018, 12:30 p.m.: New Thermal Map

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 a.m. on Sunday, July 29. The fountain at Fissure 8 remains active, with the lava flow entering the ocean. The dominant ocean entry points were on the section of coastline near Ahalanui.

Thermal image of the East Rift Zone taken on July 29, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. No overflows were reported this morning and lava levels in the channel appear low. At the coast, the south edge of the lava flow has not advanced westward in the past day, and remains less than 0.1 miles from the Pohoiki boat ramp in Isaac Hale Park. Lava along the western edge of the flow is fuming and may start oozing from this edge. Lava is actively entering the ocean along a broad 1.2 miles flow front centered near the former Ahalanui Beach Park.

No other fissures are active this morning.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

The most recent collapse event occurred at 12:08 p.m. July 29, and was similar in character and magnitude to previous events. Seismicity is slowly increasing and has been 25-30 earthquakes per hour this morning. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues.

Last night at 10:02 p.m, an earthquake on Kilauea’s south flank was felt as far north as Hilo by a few people. The magnitude-4.1 (NEIC) earthquake was weaker than recent summit earthquakes but it was felt more widely, possibly due to its greater depth of 7 km (compared with 2 km for summit earthquakes).

Fissure 8 continues to erupt, feeding lava to a perched channel that extends to the coast. The white laze plume at the distant ocean entry is visible just to the left of the gases rising from the fissure 8 cone (lower right). July 29, 2018. PC: USGS

Monday, July 30, 2018, 6 a.m.: Spillovers Continue at Fissure 8 Channel

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a 4.1 magnitude occurred on the south flank of Kīlauea last night just after 10 p.m. that was felt as far away as Kalapana to Hilo. No damage was reported.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt into the channel sending lava flows into the ocean at Ahalanui, creating a large laze plume.

HVO field crews report fluctuations in the Fissure 8 channel level, with spillovers occurring locally along the channel.

Yesterday’s flyover reports the margin of the flow remains approximately 500 feet from the Pohoiki Boat Ramp at Isaac Hale Park with the main ocean entry approximately .75 miles northeast of Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

State Highways reports no new cracks on Highway 11, but requests motorists between mile marker 28 and 32 stay on the pavement, be alert for changes in roadway conditions, and drive with caution.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware of channel spillovers and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.

The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

The Disaster Recovery Center has moved and is now at the Pāhoa Community Center located at 15-3016 Kauhale St. in Pāhoa. Hours of operations is 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays.

Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani St. in Hilo.

Sunday, July 29,10:30 p.m.: No Tsunami from 3.9-M Chain of Craters Quake

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory reports an earthquake at 4.3 mile depth with 3.9 magnitude earthquake has occurred near Chain of Craters Road at 10:03 p.m.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no tsunami threat to the Island of Hawai‘i.

Due to the volcanic activity, the following is provided for your awareness:

  • Residents in the area affected by earthquakes are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes.
  • When driving be on the lookout for cracks in roadways.
  • If ash is observed stay indoors or seek cover.

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