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4 PM: New Map Released

July 10, 2018, 8:26 AM HST
* Updated July 11, 6:45 AM
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JULY 10, 2018

Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 4 p.m.: New Map Released

The USGS released this map of the East Rift Zone as of 12 noon, July 10, 2018.

LERZ Map on July 10, 2018. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960 and 2014-2015. PC: USGS

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Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, fissures starting and stopping, and varying rates of lava effusion, map details shown here are accurate as of the date/time noted.

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View from Bryson’s quarry around 11:45 p.m. Monday, July 9, 2018, looking uprift past Halekamahina (an older ash cone) to Fissure 8, which is creating the glow behind the cone.

Lava flows in the foreground are near the base of the quarry cinder pit on July 9, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

Bright areas indicate incandescent lava, with the brightest areas showing the trace of the lava channel. A blockage in the channel produced overflows that are seen as spotty incandescence. Lava flows in the foreground are near the base of the quarry cinder pit.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava steadily into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Disruptions to the mid-channel occurred yesterday afternoon producing localized overflows along the margins of the flowfield, mostly atop earlier lavas. A significant overflow north of the cinder quarry advancing yesterday and last night towards Cinder Road has stalled. An overflow lobe moving around the west side of Kapoho Cone remains active this morning and small brushfires are reported along the margins. Downstream, lava appears to be reoccupying the channel leading to the ocean entry were multiple fingers of lava are active. The southern margin of the ocean entry shows little sign of movement.

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Yesterday’s channel disruption and overflows were caused by blockages that developed along the channel. Additional blockages and resulting overflows are likely to occur as long as the activity continues.

Fissure 22 continues to exhibit weak spattering. No other fissures are active.

Pele’s hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred meters (yards) of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

Civi Defense Report:

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava steadily into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. An overflow lobe moving around the west side of Kapoho Cone remains active and small brushfires are reported along the margins. Lava appears to be reoccupying the channel leading to the ocean entry where multiple fingers of lava are active.

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Kapoho Beach Lots and Four Corners area are closed to any access.
  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.
  • There is no immediate threat at this time, persons in areas of active flows are reminded to be on alert and prepared for changes and plan for possible evacuation.

There will be an eruption update meeting tonight at 5 p.m. at the Pāhoa High School cafeteria.

The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends. The center is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

The Salvation Army continues to operate a distribution center at the Pāhoa Community Center on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. If you have items you wish to donate, coordinate with the Salvation Army at (808) 756-0306.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 6 a.m.: Fissure 8 Flow Expands Upslope of Four Corners

USGS Map of the LERZ on July 9, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho.

The channel flow split north and south and expanded upslope of Four Corners. It appears that the north flow has stalled overnight.

The ocean entry showed reduced size late Monday. A morning flight is scheduled to determine where the active flow edges have reached overnight.

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Kapoho Beach Lots and Four Corners area are closed to any access.
  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.
  • There is no immediate threat, persons in areas of active flows are reminded to be on alert and prepared for changes and plan for evacuation.

There will be an Eruption Update meeting tonight at 5 p.m. at the Pāhoa High School cafeteria.

The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends. The center is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

Monday, July 9, 2018, 5:05 p.m.

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

Live Panorama of Lower East Rift Zone Camera from Lower East Rift Zone [PGcam], July 10, 2018, 8:45 a.m. This image is from a temporary research camera positioned near Kapoho looking southwest. From left to right, one can see the eruptive fissures, with Fissure 15 on the far left, and Fissure 8 near the center. PC: USGS

Early this afternoon (jJuly 9) observers reported multiple overflows occurring along both sides of the main lava channel, in an area extending from near the “Y” intersection at Pohoiki Road eastwards to an area just west of Kapoho Crater.

Fissure 8 and Leilani Estates viewed from the south: Houses in the foreground are located in the southern portion of Leilani Estates. Fissure 8 and surrounding lava and tephra deposits are shrouded in steam, caused by rain water being heated by the warm deposits. July 9, 2018. PC: USGS

Overflows on the upper part of the channel did not extend beyond areas previously covered in lava.

Overflows further down the channel have reached beyond the flow field, including one flow lobe that is moving northeast from the main channel towards Cinder Road.

Residents are urged to heed warnings and notices from Hawai‘i County Civil Defense.

Lava entering the ocean as seen through steam and rain early in the morning on July 9, 2018. PC: USGS

Based on information from ground observers and morning and afternoon overflights, the lower part of the main lava channel has undergone significant reorganization. In particular, the channel that had been open near Four Corners is now mostly crusted over, and plumes from ocean entry are significantly reduced. It is likely this is due to a blockage that formed in the early morning in the main channel upstream of Kapoho Crater. Flow volumes coming out of Fissure 8 remain significant, and it is possible that changes in flow channels will continue to occur in the coming days.


Poor weather and an active ocean entry in Kīlauea Volcano’s Lower East Rift Zone: This photograph taken during an early morning overflight on June 9, 2018, shows heavy, localized rain at Fissure 8 in Leilani Estates. PC: USGS

Fissure 22 continues to exhibit weak spattering.

Pele’s Hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred yards of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

HVO field crews are on site tracking activity as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawaii County Civil Defense. Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

The lower section of the Fissure 8 lava channel appears to be almost completely crusted over and the lava level in the channel was lower during the morning overflight on July 9, 2018. PC: USGS

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from Fissures 8 and 22. Continuing trade wind conditions are expected to bring vog to the southern and western parts of the Island of Hawai‘i. Vog information can be found here.

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water. Also, the lava delta is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Additionally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates “laze,” a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes and lungs.

Southern end of the active Fissure 8 flow margin north of the Analannui Park, known as the warm ponds. The flow margin is estimated to be about .3 miles from the park.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low in the area with numerous small magnitude earthquakes and low amplitude background tremor. Low amplitude tremor increased slightly on June 29 associated with renewed activity at Fissure 22. Higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should heed all Hawaii County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

At 9:20 a.m. on July 9, a collapse/explosion occurred beneath Kilauea caldera with energy equivalent to a magnitude-5.3 earthquake. The number of earthquake dropped from 25 to 40 per hour to less than 10 per hour. USGS/HVO expects the earthquakes to increase over the next day until the next collapse/explosion tomorrow. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit.

Kīlauea summit collapse continues: Small, ash-poor plume associated with the summit collapse explosion event at 9:20 a.m. on June 9, 2018. The pinkish gray plume can be seen on left side of image near the ground. PC: USGS

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano’s summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.

For forecasts of where ash would fall under forecast wind conditions, please consult the Ash3D model output here.

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts).

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