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6 PM: Highway 11 Restrictions

July 5, 2018, 8:02 AM HST
* Updated July 5, 9:16 PM
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JULY 5, 2018

Thursday, July 5, 6:40 p.m.: Highway 11 Restrictions

The Hawai‘i Police Department reports that Highway 11 is restricted to one lane in the vicinity of the 30 mile marker near Volcano Country Club due to damage to the roadway.

This hole was reported on Highway 11 on Thursday, July 5, 2018. PC: HVNP

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Motorists in the affected area are advised to drive with caution as state highways and national park personnel are on scene. Avoid the area if possible, as alternate routes are not available at this time.

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Thursday, July 5, 4 p.m: Four Corners and Kapoho Beach Lots are Closed

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and continues to expand into Kapoho Beach Lots and the Four Corners intersection.

The following policies are issued.

  • Four Corners and Kapoho Beach Lots are closed to any access.
  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.
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Kamaili Road is open to residents only.

  • The air quality along Kamaili Road can be poor, so avoid the area if possible.
  • MacKenzie Beach Park and the lava flow across Highway 137 remain closed to the public.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8am to 8pm, and is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses will resume running between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center between 7:30 a.m. and 9 p.m.
  • For more resources to help you recover from this disaster, please visit the county website. (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-related/)

Thursday, July 5, 1:45 p.m.: No Tsunami Threat From Explosive Event

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory reports a collapse/explosive event with energy equal to a 5.3 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halema‘uma‘u Crater at 1:20 p.m.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no Tsunami Threat to the Island of Hawai‘i.

PC: PTWC

Due to the volcanic activity, the following is provided for your awareness:

  • Residents in the area affected by earthquakes are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes.
  • When driving be on the lookout for cracks in roadways.
  • If ash is observed stay indoors or seek cover.

Again, there is No Tsunami Threat to the island of Hawai‘i.

Thursday, July 5, 9 a.m.: Spatter Cone Now About 180 Feet Tall

The eruption in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) continues with no significant change during the past 24 hours.

Live panorama of Lower East Rift Zone Camera from Lower East Rift Zone [PGcam]
Last updated July 5, 2018 at 7:25 a.m. PC: USGS

Fountains from Fissure 8 spatter cone continue to supply lava to the open channel with intermittent small, short-lived overflows. The spatter cone is now about 180 feet tall at its highest point, and fountains rarely rise above that point. At the coast, the northern margin of the flow field is still oozing pasty lava at several points in the area of Kapoho Ag and Beach Lots. Lava was entering the sea over a broad area this morning primarily on the northern side of the flow front. As shown by the July 2 thermal map of the flow field, the lava channel has crusted over about 0.5 miles inland of the ocean entry; lava is oozing from the flow’s molten interior into the ocean along most of its broad front.

Temporary channel blockages of the Fissure 8 channel causing minor overflows were observed just north of Kapoho Crater by USGS and Civil Air Patrol overflights.

Fissure 22 is spattering about 50 to 80 meters above a conical spatter cone and feeding a short lava flow that is moving slowly to the northeast along the edge of earlier flows.

Pele’s hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred yards of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

Thursday, July 5, 8 a.m.: Breakouts Near Four Corners

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is producing a broad ocean entry along the shoreline, and is also oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots and a flow near the Four Corners area.

The following policies are issued.

  • Due to the breakouts of lava near Four Corners and within Kapoho Beach Lots persons are reminded that these areas are closed to any access.
  • Be aware that spill overs of the channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kīlauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses will resume running between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center between 7:30 a.m and 9 p.m.
  • For more resources to help you recover from this disaster, please visit the county website. (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-related/)

Civil Defense and Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will host a community meeting at Cooper Center tonight at 6 p.m.

This animated GIF shows a sequence of radar amplitude images that were acquired by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana CosmoSkyMed satellite system. The images illustrate changes to the caldera area of Kīlauea Volcano that occurred between May 5 and July 4 at about 6 a.m.

The most recent radar scene, from July 4, shows continued motion along cracks over a broader area of the caldera floor, extending east of Halema‘uma‘u (these cracks are the scarps seen in recent photographs from the Keanakākoʻi overlook area). Click to view animation. PC: USGS

The satellite transmits a radar signal at the surface and measures the strength of the return, with bright areas indicating a strong return and dark areas a weak return. Strong returns indicate rough surfaces or slopes that point back at the radar, while weak returns come from smooth surfaces or slopes angled away from the radar. Over time, expansion of the summit eruptive vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater and the widening of Halema‘uma‘u itself are obvious. Starting in late May, the development of several cracks outside Halema‘uma‘u is clear, and inward slumping of a large portion of the western, southwestern, and northern crater rim begins. Much of this motion appears to be coincident with the small explosions from the summit that have taken place on a near daily basis since early June. The most recent radar scene, from July 4, shows continued motion along cracks over a broader area of the caldera floor, extending east of Halema‘uma‘u (these cracks are the scarps seen in recent photographs from the Keanakākoʻi overlook area). We expect this slumping to continue as long as the collapse events and overall subsidence persist.

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