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4:30 PM: Lava Near Houses in Kapoho

June 27, 2018, 5:41 PM HST
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JUNE 27, 2018

Lava from fissure 8 is entering the sea yesterday morning, June 26, 2018, on the southern portion of the flow front primarily through the open channel, but also along this 0.6 mile-wide area with multiple laze plumes from smaller oozing lobes. PC: USGS

Wednesday, June 27, 4:30 p.m.: Lava Near Houses in Kapoho

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Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is expanding south along the shoreline, and is also oozing fresh lava at Kapoho Beach Lots. Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and laze at the ocean entry continue to be very high. 

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Due to active lava near houses in Kapoho, access by residents is not allowed. No additional houses have been destroyed at this time. 

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption. 

  • The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.
  • The Disaster Recovery Center is staffed with representatives from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and State and County agencies. 
  • For more resources to help you recover from this disaster, please visit the Civil Defense website (http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/lava-related/)

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Wednesday, June 27, 10:07 a.m.: Fissure 8 Spatter Cone Nearly 200 Feet Tall

USGS HVO REPORT

Current Volcano Alert Level: WARNING
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE

Kīlauea Volcano Lower East Rift Zone

Overflows from the perched lava channel are seen as incandescent (glowing) fingers moving down the sides of the channel (left side of photo). Fissure 8 lava fountain in photo center. PC: USGS HVO

The eruption in the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ) continues with no significant change during the past 24 hours.

Fountains from Fissure 8 spatter cone continue to supply lava to the open channel with only small, short-lived overflows. Small overflows on both sides of the upslope portion of the channel occurred shortly after midnight, June 27. None of these overflows extended past the existing flow field.

The spatter cone is now 180 feet tall at its highest point, and fountains only occasionally rise above that point.

Continued eruption at Fissure 8 feeds the voluminous lava channel to the ocean as seen during this morning’s overflight of the lava-flow field. June 27, 2018. PC: USGS HVO

Lava is entering the sea this morning on the southern side of the entry area primarily through the open channel, but also along a 0.6 mile-wide area. The morning overflight revealed that the northern margin of the flow field at the coast is oozing fresh lava at several points in the area of Kapoho Beach Lots.

Pele’s Hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred yards of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

Map as of 10 a.m., June 26, 2018. (Click to see large map.)

HVO field crews are on site tracking the fountains, lava flows, and spattering from Fissure 8 as conditions allow and are reporting information to Hawai‘i County Civil Defense.

Observations are also collected on a daily basis from cracks in the area of Highway 130; no changes in temperature, crack width, or gas emissions have been noted for several days.

Volcanic gas emissions remain very high from Fissure 8 eruptions. Continuing trade wind conditions are expected to bring VOG to the southern and western parts of the Island of Hawai‘i. VOG information can be found online.

Lava continues to enter the sea along the southern Kapoho coastline. Lava enters the ocean primarily through an open channel, but also along a 1-km (0.6 mi) wide area. Also visible in the image (center right) is an area at the northern margin of the flow field that is oozing fresh lava at several points in the area of Kapoho Beach Lots. June 27, 2018. PC: USGS HVO

The ocean entry is a hazardous area. Venturing too close to an ocean entry on land or the ocean exposes you to flying debris from sudden explosive interaction between lava and water. Also, the lava delta is unstable because it is built on unconsolidated lava fragments and sand. This loose material can easily be eroded away by surf, causing the new land to become unsupported and slide into the sea. Additionally, the interaction of lava with the ocean creates “laze,” a corrosive seawater plume laden with hydrochloric acid and fine volcanic particles that can irritate the skin, eyes and lungs.

Magma continues to be supplied to the Lower East Rift Zone. Seismicity remains relatively low in the area with numerous small magnitude earthquakes and low amplitude background tremor. Higher amplitude tremor is occasionally being recorded on seismic stations close to the ocean entry.

Additional ground cracking and outbreaks of lava in the area of the active fissures are possible. Residents downslope of the region of fissures should heed all Hawai‘i County Civil Defense messages and warnings.

Kīlauea Volcano Summit

At 10:41 p.m. on June 26, after approximately 25 hours of elevated seismicity, a collapse explosion occurred at the summit producing an ash-poor steam plume that rose less than 1,000 feet above the ground surface (less than 5,000 feet above sea level) before drifting to the SW. The energy released by the event was equivalent to a magnitude 5.4 earthquake. Seismicity dropped abruptly from a high of 25 to 35 earthquakes per hour (many in the magnitude 2 to 3 range) prior to the collapse explosion down to 10 or fewer earthquakes per hour afterwards. Within 4 hours seismicity began to creep up again, averaging about 25 earthquakes per hour by daybreak (June 27). Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit.

Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano’s summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.

For forecasts of where ash would fall under forecast wind conditions, consult the Ash3D model output here.

Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) OR https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/ (other impacts).

6 a.m.: Kapoho Flow Expanding South Along Shoreline

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to be very active and is feeding a lava channel to the ocean at Kapoho. The flow is expanding south along the shoreline.

Gas emissions from the fissure eruption and laze at the ocean entry continue to be very high.

Currently, there is no immediate threat, but persons near the active flow should be prepared and heed warnings from Civil Defense.

Due to frequent earthquakes, residents in the Volcano area are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym.

If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

The Disaster Recovery Center is staffed with representatives from FEMA, the U.S. Small Business Administration, and State and County agencies.

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