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PHOTOS: $600,000+ Raised for Kaua‘i Cleanup

April 24, 2018, 10:19 AM HST
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The Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund, created in partnership between the Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF), Pierre and Pam Omidyar and numerous other donors, has raised more than $600,000 in donations as of Friday, April 20, 2018.

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

HCF, through ongoing conversations with HCF staff on Kaua‘i and the Kaua‘i County Office has identified two more nonprofits to receive the second round of grants to support immediate relief efforts to communities that have been impacted by the flooding. In the first 24 hours following the fund’s creation, the first round of grants were distributed to assist with food, water and emergency provisions.

Aloha Preschool cleanup crew, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

Grantees Aloha Preschool and ‘Aina Ho‘okupu o Kīlauea received funding to provide for specific needs. Aloha Preschool will be able to repair damage to the school and offer reduced tuition for families who have been impacted by the flooding. ‘Aina Ho‘okupu o Kīlauea will be able to continue helping families in Kalihiwai clear roads and property, put up fencing and hire a few hourly wage workers.

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

“Meeting with our team on the ground has allowed us to effectively identify immediate needs and prioritize where aid and support would be most beneficial,” said Micah Kane, president and CEO of HCF. “It is going to take a lot of work to get Kaua‘i’s community back to normal. But it’s incredibly inspiring to see the resiliency of Kaua‘i’s people. Through everyone’s support, especially our donors, we are coming together to help Kaua‘i fully recover.”

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

Donations made to the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund are being categorized based on the following three priority areas:

  • Immediate –emergency provision of food, water, shelter, healthcare
  • Stabilize—help for communities to get back to normal including childcare, reopening of schools, public health information on standing water, assistance with refuse, mold, and debris
  • Rebuild—repair of homes and facilities

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

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The Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund provides grants to local organizations that are bringing immediate relief to communities across Kaua‘i that have been impacted by the flooding, including assistance to residents who have been displaced from their homes or are cut-off from receiving basic necessities including medical supplies, food and water. In the first 24 hours, the first round of grants were distributed to Mālama Kaua‘i, Kaua‘i Independent Food Bank and the Kaua‘i North Shore Food Pantry.

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

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HCF, Pierre and Pam Omidyar and two anonymous donors established the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund on April 18, 2018, to assist with recovery efforts from the devastating damage caused by the recent flooding. The Omidyars, through the Omidyar ‘Ohana Fund, and HCF each contributed $100,000, along with contributions from two anonymous donors and the Agne Family Fund at HCF, for a grand total of $260,000.

Aloha Preschool cleanup, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

Donations to the Kaua‘i Relief and Recovery Fund can be made online at HawaiiCommunityFoundation.org/KauaiRelief or by mail at Hawai‘i Community Foundation, 827 Fort Street Mall, Honolulu, HI 96813.

Aloha Preschool cleanup crew, Kaua‘i, April 2018. Courtesy photo.

About the Hawai‘i Community Foundation

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With over 100 years of community service, the Hawai‘i Community Foundation (HCF) is the leading philanthropic institution in the state. HCF is a steward of more than 850 funds, including more than 250 scholarship funds, created by donors who desire to transform lives and improve communities. In 2017, HCF distributed more than $59 million in grants and contracts statewide, including more than $6 million in scholarships. HCF also serves as a resource on community issues and trends in the nonprofit sector.

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