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S. Segment of Kona’s Māmalahoa Bypass to Open

November 2, 2016, 9:59 AM HST
* Updated November 2, 10:02 AM
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The Māmalahoa bypass and its connection to Haleki`i Street in Kealakekua is shown in this modified Google Maps image (click to enlarge). Big Island Now graphic.

The Māmalahoa bypass and its connection to Haleki`i Street in Kealakekua is shown in this modified Google Maps image (click to enlarge). Big Island Now graphic.

The long-awaited 2.2-mile, $27.9 million southern segment of the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass that will provide relief to motorists traveling in South Kona will open to the public on Friday, Nov. 4.

The bypass is located midway between the shoreline and Māmalahoa Highway.

The northern segment of the bypass starts at the southern edge of Keauhou and runs approximately 3.5 miles to the bottom of Haleki‘i Street below Kealakekua’s Kona Scenic subdivision.

This new southern segment extends the roadway, which the Hawai’i County Council named Ali’i Drive, another 2.2 miles from Kealakekua to a new signalized intersection with Māmalahoa Highway in Nāpo’opo’o.

A large portion of the South Kona community works in either North Kona or South Kohala and commutes daily along Māmalahoa Highway. The two-lane bypass gives motorists an alternate route between North and South Kona.

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Completing the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass was one of Mayor Billy Kenoi’s priorities upon taking office in 2008. The mayor was personally involved in talks with Kona residents to ensure that this bypass helps meet the critical need for transportation infrastructure in West Hawai‘i.

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Māmalahoa Highway Bypass Timeline

1960 – A Māmalahoa Relief Highway was first envisioned in “A Plan For Kona,” a document prepared with community input for the State Planning Office. The plan was transmitted to the Hawai‘i County Board of Supervisors, the predecessor of today’s Hawai‘i County Council.

1996 ­– In rezoning the area that would become Hōkūli‘a, County ordinances formalized the developer’s agreement with the community to complete the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass from Keauhou to Captain Cook.

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1999 – The Environmental Impact Statement for the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass was completed. Developer 1250 Oceanside Partners broke ground on the Hōkūli‘a development, the first phase of which included the northern segment of the road.

2008 – The County proposed a number of improvements prior to the opening of the northern segment of the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass. Improvements included work along Ali‘i Drive, along Haleki‘i Street, and on Māmalahoa Highway. These improvements allowed residents to benefit immediately from the northern segment of the bypass before the southern segment was completed.

March 2009 – Under a grant of easement in anticipation of dedicating the road to the County, the northern segment of the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass opened to limited traffic – one lane southbound from 3:30 – 6:30 p.m. on weekdays only. On March 10, the first day it was open, 650 vehicles took the drive from Keauhou to Kealakekua.

June 2010 – The Māmalahoa Highway Bypass between Keauhou and Haleki‘i Street opened to northbound and southbound traffic from 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., 7 days a week.

2012 – The northern segment of the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass and the .8-mile portion of Haleki‘i Street makai of Muli Street was dedicated to the County.

January 2013 – The Māmalahoa Highway Bypass opened daily, 24 hours a day. Restrictions on vehicle types and sizes were removed.

November 2013 – The Hawai‘i County Council passed a resolution regarding the Māmalahoa Highway Bypass, naming it Ali‘i Drive.
July 2014 – Ground was broken for the southern segment of the bypass.

November 4, 2016 – The 2.2-mile southern segment of Māmalahoa Highway Bypass opens, completing Ali‘i Drive from Kailua to Nāpo’opo‘o.

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