Lifestyle

Native Bird Photography in Hawai‘i

September 28, 2016, 8:41 AM HST
* Updated September 8, 5:22 PM
Listen to this Article
1 minute
Loading Audio...
A
A
A

‘Apapane, a common endemic Hawaiian Honeycreeper found on all of the main Hawaiian islands in native forest habitat. Photo courtesy of Jack Jeffrey.

‘Apapane, a common endemic Hawaiian Honeycreeper found on all of the main Hawaiian islands in native forest habitat. Photo courtesy of Jack Jeffrey.

 

Renowned Hawai‘i photographer and biologist Jack Jeffrey will share the experiences, challenges and joys of capturing native forest birds on film at two sessions at the Lyman Museum.

The first session is Monday evening, Oct. 3, from 7 to 8:30 p.m.; a “matinée” will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 4, from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

Through personal stories and breathtaking photos of these elusive creatures in their habitats, Jeffrey will bring attendees into the real picture of wildlife photography.

Most native birds in Hawai‘i are seldom seen, and even more rarely photographed. Found only at high elevation in remote rainforests, many of these birds are critically endangered, with just several to a few hundred individuals of each species remaining in the wild.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

Their habitats—where the weather is often wet, foggy, cold, and clammy—present extreme conditions that are good for neither camera equipment nor intrepid photographers.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

These forests are often accessible only by helicopter or by hiking many hours along muddy slopes and trails.

The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawai‘i. Located in historic downtown Hilo at 276 Haili St., the museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

For more information, call (808) 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Stay in-the-know with daily or weekly
headlines delivered straight to your inbox.
Cancel
Mahalo for Subscribing
×

Comments

This comments section is a public community forum for the purpose of free expression. Although Big Island Now encourages respectful communication only, some content may be considered offensive. Please view at your own discretion. View Comments