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UPDATE: Weekend High Surf Advisory, Flash Flood Watch

August 5, 2016, 4:04 PM HST
* Updated August 7, 9:15 AM
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ivette

Tropical Storm Ivette, Aug. 7, 2016. NOAA image.

UPDATE: Aug. 7, 6 a.m.

A Flash Flood Watch remains in effect from 6 a.m. HST Sunday morning through Monday afternoon for all Hawaiian Islands.

The High Surf Advisory is in effect until noon HST today.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami, Florida, is issuing advisories on Tropical Storm Ivette, located about 1,100 miles east-southeast of Hilo.

Ivette is forecast to continue moving west-northwest at about 12 mph, and cross longitude 140W into the Central Pacific Hurricane Center’s area of responsibility later today or tonight. Hilo is located at 155W longitude.

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ORIGINAL POST: Aug. 6

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Today at 3:22 p.m., the National Weather Service in Honolulu issued a high surf advisory and a flash flood watch for all Hawaiian Islands over the weekend due to the remnants of tropical cyclone Howard. The best chances for flash flooding will be over the northern end of the state.

The high surf advisory is in effect from 6 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, to 6 a.m. HST Sunday, Aug. 7. Surf is expected to be in the 6- to 9-foot range along east-facing shores.

Expect strong breaking waves, shore break and strong longshore and rip currents, making swimming difficult and dangerous.

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Beachgoers, swimmers and surfers should heed all advice given by ocean safety officials and exercise caution.

The flash flood watch will be in effect from Sunday morning through Monday afternoon.

Abundant moisture from the remnants of tropical cyclone Howard and an upper trough moving near the islands will bring a conducive environment for heavy rain and thunderstorms.

Saturated grounds from recent rain events will exacerbate the threat of flash flooding from the forecast rainfall.

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is very dangerous.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

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