Business

KCH Recognizes ICU for Infection Prevention

April 7, 2016, 9:45 AM HST
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Employees in the attached photo are from left to right: Front row: Hailey de la Torre, Chris Colgrove, Daisy LaDorre, Lynn Reinert and Rose Keith Back row: Dawn Gallardo, Mike Savage, and Ray Augustinus. KCH photo.

Employees in the attached photo are from left to right:
Front row: Hailey de la Torre, Chris Colgrove, Daisy LaDorre, Lynn Reinert and Rose Keith
Back row: Dawn Gallardo, Mike Savage, and Ray Augustinus. KCH photo.

The Intensive Care Unit at Kona Community Hospital was recently recognized by both hospital leadership and employees for infection prevention.

It has been over three years since the ICU has had a Central Line Blood Stream infection or Ventilator Associated Pneumonia infection.

According to the hospital, the record of infection management is due to the efforts between the ICU, the Respiratory Therapy department, and the Hospitalist Physicians.

A celebration at the hospital included a presentation of Certificates of Recognition to all three groups by KCH Infection Control Director Lisa Downing. The certificates recognized the efforts to contribute towards patient safety.

The Intensive Care Unit has not experienced a CLABSI infection in more than 1,420 days, meaning that roughly seven patients avoided a CLABSI infection, which has a mortality rate of up to 25 percent. It also represents a savings of approximately $100,000 and over 90 unnecessary patient days.

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Likewise, the ICU has not had a Ventilator Associated Pneumonia infection for over 1,117 days. This equals roughly thirteen patients who have avoided VAP, which has a mortality rate of 50%. The resulting savings is approximately $260,000 and 170 unnecessary patient days.

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“Our employees are invested in patient care. No one wants patients to get sick, so we monitor a patient’s infection status on a daily basis,” said Hailey de la Torre, ICU Nurse Manager.

In 2009, hospital staff implemented a variety of new strategies and policies to prevent healthcare associated infections. Changing standards of care for infection prevention was a hospital-wide effort.

The initiative required new policies, staff and physician education, and teaching modules, in addition to updated supplies.

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Respiratory Therapy Manager Lynn Reinert stressed that the success of infection management in the ICU is a result of vigilant best practices employed by the collaborative team.

“We’re very proud of our staff and this achievement,” Reinert and de la Torre both said.

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