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Kilauea Summit Update – 6/15/15

June 15, 2015, 9:13 AM HST
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After nearly a week of inflationary tilt at the summit of Kilauea, tiltmeters at the summit began to show deflation Sunday evening.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the change occurred at about 6:30 p.m. and since then, the lava lake within the Overlook crater has fallen to about 177 feet below the floor of Halema’uma’u, a 26 foot drop from what was measured on Friday morning.

In addition to a change in tilt, HVO reported the continuation of episodic bursts of seismic tremor that is associated with periods of vigorous spattering within the Overlook vent.

For the week ending June 9, HVO says the sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged between 2,200 and 4,700 tonnes per day.

Seismic activity below Kilauea’s summit and Puʻu ʻŌʻō both remain at background levels.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

No significant tilt has been noted along the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō, an extension of what has been continuously in the area in recent weeks.

ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW AD

According to HVO, for the week ending on June 9, the emission rate of all East Rift Zones vents was about 430 tonnes per day.

The June 27 lava flow is being closely observed by HVO scientists through webcam and satellite imagery. Those images show active lava extending from breakouts that are to the northeast of Puʻu ʻŌʻō and contained within 5 miles of the area.

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June 11: The distal tip remains about 8 miles upslope of Pahoa, and continues to push into an ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: The distal tip remains about 8 miles upslope of Pahoa, and continues to push into an ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Another view of the distal tip, looking northeast. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Another view of the distal tip, looking northeast. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Breakouts were occurring throughout the flow field, with fingers of fresh silvery lava covering the old, darker flows. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Breakouts were occurring throughout the flow field, with fingers of fresh silvery lava covering the old, darker flows. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Activity along the northern tree line continues, as lava creeps into the adjacent ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Activity along the northern tree line continues as lava creeps into the adjacent ohia forest. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: A new skylight to peer into. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: A new skylight to peer into. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Ropey pahoehoe quickly cools, forming endless rows of braids. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Ropey pahoehoe quickly cools, forming endless rows of braids. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Folds of pahoehoe curl over and crack, revealing the orange glow of the molten lava within. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Folds of pahoehoe curl over and crack, revealing the orange glow of the molten lava within. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Lava pours out of a break in the wall of a lava tube. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: Lava pours out of a break in the wall of a lava tube. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: One of the spatter cones within Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater spitting bits of lava. Photo: Extreme Exposures Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: One of the spatters cones within Pu‘u ‘O‘o crater spitting bits of lava. Photo: Extreme Exposures Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11:  A closer look inside of the new skylight. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: A closer look inside of the new skylight. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: The trailing edge of a fresh breakout cools, forming finger-like protrusions, floating on the river of molten lava. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

June 11: The trailing edge of a fresh breakout cools, forming finger-like protrusions, floating on the river of molten lava. Photo: Extreme Exposure Media/Paradise Helicopters.

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