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7:15 PM: No Tsunami Threat From Explosive Event

July 13, 2018, 7:45 AM HST (Updated July 13, 2018, 7:21 PM)
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JULY 13, 2018

Friday, July 13, 2018, 7:15 p.m.: No Tsunami Threat From Explosive Event

Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory reports a collapse/explosive event with energy equal to a 5.2 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halema‘uma‘u Crater at 7:08 p.m.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is NO TSUNAMI THREAT to the Island of Hawai‘i.

Due to the volcanic activity, the following is provided for your awareness:

  • Residents in the area affected by earthquakes are advised to monitor utility connections of gas, electricity, and water after earthquakes.
  • Motorists be on the lookout for cracks in roadways.
  • If ash is observed, seek cover and stay indoors.
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Again, there is NO TSUNAMI THREAT to the island of Hawai‘i.

Friday, July 13, 2018, 4 p.m.: Chance of Thunderstorms Through the Weekend

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent toward Kapoho. At Kapoho Cone, the majority of the flow is heading south into the ocean at Ahalanui. A small lava island appeared offshore yesterday and was observed oozing lava this morning. Fissure 22 has no visible activity. The National Weather Service is forecasting increased rainfall with a chance of thunderstorms beginning after midnight and continuing through the weekend.

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that spill overs of the flow channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • The ocean entry continues to produce a “laze” plume. Take precautions and stay out of the plume to avoid exposure to hydrochloric acid and glass particles, which can irritate the skin, eyes, and lungs.
  • On the weather:
  • The best place to be if lightning affects the area is indoors.
  • Be prepared for interruptions to utilities.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kīlauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Kea‘au High School Gym, is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on weekends. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

Friday, July 13, 2018, 1:45 p.m.: Video of Whirlwind, New Thermal Map

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel leading northeastward from the vent. Lava levels in the upper channel between Fissure 8 and Pohoiki Road are low this morning but are expected to rise after the next collapse/explosive vent at Kīlauea summit. The channelized ʻaʻā flow west of Kapoho Crater continues to be the main ocean entry at the southern edge of the flow front this morning.

Despite no visible surface connection to the Fissure 8 channel, lava continues to ooze out at several points on the 3.7 miles-wide flow front into the ocean. In general, the laze plumes from the oozing appear weaker this morning. In addition, a small island appeared yesterday just offshore the northern edge that continues to ooze lava this morning.

Fissure 22 has no visible activity. No other fissures are active but many were steaming this morning, possibly due to the increasing humidity in the area.

Pele’s hair and other lightweight volcanic glass fragments from the lava fountain at Fissure 8 continue to fall downwind of the fissure, dusting the ground within a few hundred yards of the vent. High winds may waft lighter particles to greater distances. Residents are urged to minimize exposure to these volcanic particles, which can cause skin and eye irritation similar to volcanic ash.

A whirlwind spins skyward on the northwest side of the fissure 8 cinder cone in this video taken on July 10, 2018.

A number of whirlwinds have formed in the area due to the extreme heat of the open lava channel heating the air above it. As the heated air quickly rises, a light wind can push the air column to begin a rotation, which spins faster as it is stretched and narrowed. Because of recurring rainfall near the fissure, moisture and clouds made the whirlwind easier to see for the brief time period it was active. The brown plume is gases rising from the Fissure 8 lava fountain.

This thermal map shows the fissure system and lava flows as of 6 a.m. on Thursday, July 12. The fountain at Fissure 8 remains active, with the lava flow entering the ocean at numerous points in Kapoho. The channel overflow from July 9 and 10 created a new lobe that reached the ocean over the past day, destroying Ahalanui Park and the nearby charter school. A robust ocean entry plume was active at the location of Ahalanui Park.

Thermal Image of the East Rift Zone taken on July 12, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

The black and white area is the extent of the thermal map. Temperature in the thermal image is displayed as gray-scale values, with the brightest pixels indicating the hottest areas. The thermal map was constructed by stitching many overlapping oblique thermal images collected by a handheld thermal camera during a helicopter overflight of the flow field. The base is a copyrighted color satellite image (used with permission) provided by Digital Globe.

Friday, July 13, 2018, 6 a.m.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the perched channel heading northeast from the vent toward Kapoho.

The majority of the flow is now heading South at Kapoho Cone toward Pohoiki.

The National Weather Service is forecasting increased rainfall with a chance of thunderstorms over the weekend.

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Be aware that spill overs of the flow channel and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field, do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.
  • Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kīlauea eruption.

The Disaster Recovery Center is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekends, and is located at the Kea‘au High School Gym. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

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