4 PM: Overflow Reported Northwest of Kapoho Cone

July 23, 2018, 5:56 AM HST (Updated July 24, 2018, 6:13 AM)
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This news story will be updated throughout the day as new information becomes available and new articles will be added to the website’s “News” sectionPrevious information about ongoing events can be found in Big Island Now’s “Volcano Blog” section.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT LIVESTREAM LINK

CLICK HERE FOR INTERACTIVE LAVA MAP FOR JULY 23, 2018

Monday July 23, 2018, 4 p.m: Overflow Reported Northwest of Kapoho Cone

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The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues from Fissure 8 into the lava channel, sending flows to the ocean entry at Ahalanui and producing a large laze plume. Following last night’s collapse event at the summit, overflows were reported northwest of Kapoho Cone but stalled before threatening any structures. The southern flow margin at the ocean entry remains unchanged.

This image is from a temporary research camera positioned near Kapoho looking southwest. From left to right, one can see the eruptive fissures, with Fissure 15 on the far left, and Fissure 8 near the center. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

The Volcano area is experiencing poor air quality due to easterly winds. The earthquake activity in the area continues to cause road damage on Highway 11. Motorists are advised to be alert for changing road conditions, especially between mile marker 28 and 32.

The following guidelines remain in effect:

  • Check all utility connections of water, gas, and electricity for potential damage from earthquake activity.
  • In areas of high SO2, limit outdoor exposure and stay indoors with the windows closed. If the air quality becomes too poor, leave the area.
  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard. Be aware that channel overflows and other breakouts are possible on the active flow field.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawaii County that have been affected by the Kilauea eruption.

  • The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Kea‘au High School Gym, is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.
  • Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani St. in Hilo.

Monday July 23, 2018, 1 p.m: New Map Released; Next Collapse Event Expected Tomorrow Morning

Map as of 1 p.m. July 23, 2018.

USGS Map of East Rift Zone as of July 23, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, fissures starting and stopping, and varying rates of lava effusion, map details shown here are accurate as of the date/time noted. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960 and 2014-2015.

Fissure 8 continues to erupt lava into the channel leading northeastward from the vent. UAV crews found overflows just northwest of Kapoho Cone following a collapse event at the summit at 8:54 last night. The overflows were mostly confined to the existing flow field and stalled before threatening any nearby homes The most vigorous ocean entry is located a few hundred meters northeast of the southern flow margin with a few tiny pahoehoe toes entering the ocean from the Kapoho Bay lobe to the north. The southern margin of the flow remains about .3 miles from the boat ramp at Isaac Hale Park; however, a new lobe has started from the southern lobe and is active along its southwestern margin slowly heading toward the ocean.

The last collapse event occurred at 8:53 p.m. Sunday, July 22. Seismicity dropped following the event and has increased to 20 to 40 earthquakes per hour by this morning. The next collapse event is expected tomorrow morning. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues.

The Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) team frequently works into the night, flying aircraft (drones) that hover over the active lava channel to collect data and look for changes, such as significant channel overflows. July 22, 2018. Click to enlarge. PC: USGS

Monday July 23, 2018, NOON: High SO2 Levels, Poor Air Quality Reported 

The National Weather Service has forecast a slight disruption in the trade winds, causing surface winds to be more easterly than normal. Due to this current wind pattern, Volcano is experiencing high levels of SO2.

Other areas downwind of Fissure 8 are also susceptible to poor air quality.

Due to the potential air quality hazards, take the following precautions:

Limit outdoor exposure and stay indoors with all windows closed.

Turn on an air filtration system.
If the air quality becomes too poor, leave the area.

The latest air quality measurements from the University of Hawaii’s Vog Measurement and Prediction Project can be found here.

8 AM: Officials Very Concerned About Highway 11

State and county staff are closely monitoring the condition of Highway 11 between mile
marker 28.5 at the entrance to Hawaiian Volcano National Park and mile marker 31.7 past Namakani Paio Campground.

Because of cracks developing on the road, all motorists should drive cautiously in this area.

Be aware that authorities are very concerned with the conditions on Highway 11 and are closely monitoring the situation.

You will be kept informed as the situation develops.

6 a.m.: 5.3-M Collapse Event Damages Highway 11

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports that eruption activity continues from Fissure 8 into the lava channel flowing to the ocean entry at Ahalanui.

As of yesterday’s overflight report, the southern margin of the flow remains about .25 miles from Isaac Hale-Pohoiki Boat Ramp.

Earthquakes continue at the Kīlauea summit.

On roadway updates for the Volcano area, State Highways reports that the summit collapse event last night caused additional cracks on Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 Mile Markers. Motorists are advised to stay on the pavement and to be on the alert for changing roadway conditions.

The following policies remain in effect:

  • Do not access the active flow field due to extreme hazard.  Be aware that channel overflows and breakouts are possible on the active flow field.
  • Residents are reminded to check utility connections of gas, water and electricity after earthquakes.

Disaster assistance is available island-wide to individuals and businesses in Hawai‘i County that have been affected by the Kīlauea eruption.

The Disaster Recovery Center, located at the Kea‘au High School Gym, is open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. If you need a ride, buses run between the two shelters and the Disaster Recovery Center.

Access placards are available at the Civil Defense office located at 920 Ululani St. in Hilo.

Sunday, July 22, 10:55 p.m.: 5.3-M Collapse Event Damages Highway 11

State Highways reports that the 5.3-magnitude collapse event which occurred at 8:54 p.m. has caused additional damage to Highway 11 between the 28 and 32 Mile Markers near Volcano.

Motorists are urged  to drive with extreme caution in the area.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports a collapse event with energy equal to a 5.3 magnitude earthquake has occurred at Halema‘uma‘u Crater at 8:54 p.m. on July 22.

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reports there is no tsunami threat to the island of Hawai‘i.

ITS PRELIMINARY PARAMETERS ARE:

ORIGIN TIME – 0854 PM HST 22 JUL 2018
COORDINATES – 19.4 NORTH 155.3 WEST
LOCATION – IN THE SUMMIT REGION OF KILAUEA VOLCANO
MAGNITUDE – 5.3

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