East Hawaii News

Kilauea’s Summit Lava Lake Rises into View

February 29, 2016, 4:41 PM HST
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Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook, as of 4:16 p.m. HVO webcam image.

Panorama of Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook Vent from Halemaʻumaʻu Overlook, as of 4:16 p.m. HVO webcam image.

Kilauea’s Halemaumau Crater lava lake continues to fluctuate between inflationary and deflationary tilt, causing the lake levels to rise and fall.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory noted that early Monday morning glow from the surface of the lava lake was visible from the Jagger Museum overlook via a webcam on HVO’s roof.

The lava lake’s level had reportedly spent several days rising and was intermittently in view at the Jagger Museum, according to HVO.

At about 3:30 a.m. after peaking, the lake began deflationary tilt.

As of 9:02 a.m., the lake was about 75 feet below the rim of the Overlook crater.

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HVO notes that the activity is within the realm of normal activity with periods of increased tremor, which is associated with spattering within the crater’s vent.

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As of Feb. 25, the sulfur dioxide emission rate was around 3,000 metric tons per day.

The last time Kilauea’s lava lake was high enough to be viewed from the overlook was in May of last year.

Activity within Pu’u O’o and the June 27, 2014 lava flow remains within recent norms.

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