Business

State Launches ‘Buy Local, Give Aloha’ Campaign

November 21, 2012, 9:30 AM HST
* Updated November 21, 12:54 PM
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Gov. Neil Abercrombie and the state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism will launch a campaign today to urge residents to buy and gift locally made products this holiday season.

Program initiatives will also promote export of Hawaii’s products to mainland and international markets.

The governor and several business leaders including, Jane Sawyer, district director, US Small Business Administration and Lauren Zirbel, executive director of the Hawaii Food Industry Association, will be on hand when the governor holds a press conference today to launch the campaign.

Other business leaders attending the event include Amy Hammond, manager of the Made-In-Hawaii Festival, and Toby Portner and Melissa White, co-founders of the Hawaii Fashion Incubator.

Officials note that buying local supports Hawaii businesses while helping to further stimulate the local economy.

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National companies, such as American Express, are also helping to promote local businesses. For the third straight year, American Express is promoting Small Shop Saturday, a campaign to support small businesses nationwide.

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Realizing how difficult it is for small shop owners across the country to compete against big box retailers and their Black Friday shopping sales, the credit card company is offering a $25 discount to registered card owners who shop at small businesses the Saturday after Thanksgiving.

Several shops across the Big Island are participating in Small Shop Saturday including Hilo stores Orchid Land Surfshop, Sig Zane Designs, Aloha Grown and Hilo Bay Paddler, among others.

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