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Hawaiʻi Officers Honored for National Police Week

May 15, 2017, 10:26 AM HST
* Updated May 15, 10:30 AM
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Hawaiʻi’s law enforcement officers from city, county, state, military and federal agencies who died while protecting and serving the people of Hawaiʻi are being honored this week.

All of Hawaii’s police chiefs, as well as Hawaiʻi Governor David Ige, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell, and Acting United States Attorney Elliot Enoki attended the Hawaiʻi Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation’s service to remember Hawaii’s sixty-five officers who died in the line of duty. Photo Courtesy

On Sunday, the Hawaiʻi Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation held its second annual dedication and memorial service event to honor and remember Hawaiʻi’s sixty-five officers who died in the line of duty, as well as those who continue to protect and serve the community.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation designating the week in which May 15 falls as National Police Week. In 2017, National Police Week runs from May 14-20, 2017.

The Hawaiʻi Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation Annual Dedication and Memorial Service was held at the Hawaiʻi Law Enforcement Memorial in downtown Honolulu’s Capitol District.

Elected officials, dignitaries, police officers and the community attended the memorial. Last year, more than 300 people paid their respects to Hawaiʻi’s fallen officers at the event.

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Other Police Week events include a Police Week Procession and Police Week Memorial March on Monday, May 15 – both of which are organized by the Honolulu Police Department.

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Here on Hawaiʻi, station tours for all districts will be offered to the public. Station tours at the Hilo Police station will be on Wednesday, May 17, with tours being held at 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.

The four Big Island officers honored included: Officer Manuel Cadinha (1918), Officer William Oili (1936),
Officer Ronald Jichaku (May 7, 1990) and Officer Kenneth Keliipio (March 27, 1997).

On average, a law enforcement officer is killed in the line of duty somewhere in the United States every 63 hours. Since the first known line-of-duty death in 1791, over 20,000 law enforcement officers have made the ultimate sacrifice.

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During Sunday’s event, Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard (HI-02) joined in remembering Hawaiʻi’s 65 officers who died in the line of duty. In her remarks, Rep. Gabbard honored current, former, and fallen law enforcement officers, and paid special tribute to their families.

“This memorial here and this opportunity we have today reminds us of the thin blue line—that symbol which represents the important relationship between law enforcement and our community as the protectors of fellow civilians from those who seek to harm them,” said Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. “It symbolizes that great trust and responsibility that exists within those who carry the badge. It reminds us of those who are called to put their lives on the line to serve and protect and those who have sacrificed all.”

All of Hawaii’s police chiefs were in attendance, as well as Hawaiʻi Governor David Ige, Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell, and Acting United States Attorney Elliot Enoki.

The Hawaiʻi Law Enforcement Memorial Foundation was formed in February 2010 to design, construct, and maintain a monument to honor law enforcement officers from city, county, state, military, and federal agencies who have died in the line of duty while serving the people of Hawaiʻi.

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