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USGS Releases New Map, Photos and Video

June 13, 2018, 1:27 PM HST (Updated June 13, 2018, 2:48 PM)
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The U.S. Geological Survey released this updated map, photos and video of the East Rift Zone on Wednesday, June 13, 2018.

Map as of 10 a.m., June 13, 2018.

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Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea’s lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, fissures starting and stopping, and varying rates of lava effusion, map details shown here are accurate as of the date/time noted. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960 and 2014-2015.

Fissure 8 lava fountain during this morning’s overflight of the lower East Rift Zone.

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Steam and fume rises from fissures 16 and 18 in distance (upper left). View is toward the east.

Fissure 8 lava fountains continue to reach heights of 130-150 feet from within the growing cone of cinder and spatter, which is now about 130 feet at its highest point.

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Fountaining at fissure 8 continues to feed the fast-moving channelized flow that is entering the ocean at Kapoho.

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View of the ocean entry and the resulting laze plume where lava is entering the sea.

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As of June 12, lava entering the ocean had added about 100 ha (250 acres) of new land to the Island of Hawai‘i.

Closer view of new land in the Kapoho area.

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The new coastline, following the ragged lava-ocean interface, is approximately 1.3 miles in length. The white steam/laze plume marks the location of the most active lava entry site during the morning overflight.

A UAS mission on June 13, 2018, filmed details of the dramatic changes occurring within Halema’uma’u crater at Kīlauea’s summit. Clearly visible are the steep crater walls that continue to slump inward and downward in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim.

UAS survey of Halema‘uma‘u crater rim, at Kīlauea Volcano’s summit, June 13, 2018.

A UAS mission on June 13, 2018, filmed details of the dramatic changes occurring within Halema’uma’u crater at Kīlauea's summit. Clearly visible are the steep crater walls that continue to slump inward and downward in response to the ongoing subsidence at the summit. The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim.This video was taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems). Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. The overflights collect visual information on what is happening at this rapidly changing eruption site. Scientists will be examining the footage in detail to understand how the expanding collapse area is evolving, the extent of tephra fall, and other clues as to what is happening at Kīlauea's summit. This information informs assessment of hazards, which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park.#usgs #hvo #hawaiianvolcanoobservatory #kilauea #volcano #KilaueaErupts #LERZeruption #LERZ #KilaueaEruption

Posted by USGS Volcanoes on Wednesday, June 13, 2018

This video was taken from a UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems). Limited UAS flights into this hazardous area are conducted with permission and coordination with Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The overflights collect visual information on what is happening at this rapidly changing eruption site. Scientists will be examining the footage in detail to understand how the expanding collapse area is evolving, the extent of tephra fall, and other clues as to what is happening at Kīlauea’s summit. This information informs assessment of hazards, which is shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers.

Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.

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